Christian Apocrypha Site of the Week 3

I have been thinking this past week about the typical contents of CA collections and what texts tend to be included and what get left out. The parameters are usually temporal—i.e., most collections include only material that is pre-Constantinian (the Pleiades collection is an exception)—though earlier studies of CA did include some later texts because there were not that many texts yet available. This led me on a search for some of these forgotten texts; many of which are found on the Church Fathers page of the New Advent site (scroll down to “Apocrypha”). The English translations of the texts […]

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On-Line Books on the Christian Apocrypha

I have just added a new page to the "New Testament Apocrypha" section of my web site. It is a list, with links, of On-line Books Related to the Study of the Christian Apocrypha. The list is fairly extensive, though covers only up to the turn of the twentieth century. Included are such CA classics as Tischendorf's Evangelia Apocrypha and M. R. James' The Apocryphal New Testament, and also some lesser-known early studies of the CA by Variot, Nicholas, and others. I will add additional texts when I become aware of them; suggestions are welcome.

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The Sisters of Sinai

I have just finished reading Janet Soskice’s popularization of the discovery of the famous Sinai palimpsest by Agnes Smith Lewis and Margaret Smith Gibson (The Sisters of Sinai: How Two lady Adventurers Discovered the Hidden Gospels. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 2009). The “Hidden Gospels” alluded to in the title refers not to non-canonical texts (as it often does) but to a fourth-century Syriac translation of the canonical gospels hidden under a seventh-century collection of tales of women saints. The palimpsest represents our earliest complete witness to the gospels, albeit in translation, and caused quite a stir upon its publication […]

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CA Web Site of the Week 2

The Christian Apocrypha Web Site of this week is the home page of the Association pour l’étude de la littérature apocryphe chrétienne (AELAC). AELAC is an academic association based in Switzerland and France dedicated to the publication of finely-crafted critical editions of Old and New Testament Apocrypha in a series called Corpus Christianorum Series Apocryphorum. To date, editions have appeared on various Apocryphal Acts, the Ascension of Isaiah, Irish Apocrypha, and most recently the Kerygma Petri; the next volume to be published will likely be my edition of the Greek tradition of the Infancy Gospel of Thomas. The site contains […]

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Secret Mark in Biblical Archeology Review

The latest issue of Biblical Archeological Review (Nov/Dec 2009) features a series of articles on Secret Mark. This is the second time in recent memory (Scott Brown contributed a piece back in 2005) that BAR has looked at the text. Presumably the topic is attractive to BAR editor Hershel Shanks, who is a vociferous supporter of the authenticity of certain artifacts such as the James Ossuary. Several other bloggers have commented on the articles (including James Tabor at Taborblog, and Timo Paananen at Salainen evankelista; note also Mark Goodacre at NTblog has recently posted a clip of an interview by […]

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CA Web Site of the Week

As I work through my web site (tonyburke.ca) and update various materials (including my links to sites focusing on the Christian Apocrypha), I thought it would be useful to offer more expansive descriptions of sites of interest in a series of “CA Web Site[s] of the Week” (cue applause). The first is Andrew Bernhard’s gospels.net. Bernhard, an Oxford Graduate, is the author of Other Early Christian Gospels (London: T & T Clark, 2006) a study of the CA texts preserved in early papyri (e.g., P.Oxy. 840, The Egerton Gospel, the Greek manuscripts of the Gospel of Thomas, and others). These […]

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Work in Progress

Apocryphicity has suffered from considerable neglect lately. There are several reasons for this. For one, I am under review for Tenure, and the file preparation has taken some of my time. Also, I have a heavy course load this semester. And, there has been an illness (and subsequent death) in the family, leading to the abandonment of my SBL paper (see further below) and a curtailing of other projects. Nevertheless, it’s probably time to put some work into my languishing Blog. I thought I’d begin with some updates on a variety of projects. 1.  I look forward very soon to […]

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